Does a good morning routine make you a better blogger?

And does it contribute to being successful?

Woman writing in her journal
Photo by Trent Szmolnik on Unsplash

I’ve just read an article written by a successful blogger interviewing other successful bloggers about their morning routine and how it contributes to their productivity during the day.

In every single one of the six interviews I read, no matter when they woke up, no matter what time of the morning, be it 5 a.m. or 9, their first task was writing. Journaling was the most popular thing, setting out goals for the day, reflecting and thinking.

Clearly none of these bloggers have children, bar one, who said she had a 5 year old. She writes before the child wakes. I have to say, in my experience of 5 year olds, she must have to get up pretty early.

I’m not criticising, I’m just astonished and slightly envious. When I was younger and, thank goodness, healthy I was married and bringing up 5 children. The mornings were absolute mayhem, getting them up, ready for school, making sure they had breakfast, games kit, packed lunches etc etc. Every mum will know the drill. Certainly no room to put a word on a page!

The only thing I got up early for was to feed the baby, or in later years, to grab a quick coffee before the chaos began!Too exhausted to write anything except note in child’s homework book or something.

Once the last one went to school, I started and ran my own business (with my friend and business partner) for the next eight years. Then, going to the gym early in the morning was more important to my wellbeing.

My husband worked long hours, I tried to fit my work into school hours, so I was able to pick the kids up. I also worked weekends.

During this time, I did keep a journal of sorts, when I had time, or remembered to write in it. When my youngest child was about 12, I started a degree course with The Open University, when obviously writing was intrinsic to the course.

My morning routine was no less chaotic, I still had four children at home, my eldest having gone to Uni by this time.

Sometimes, as the kids got older and were sleeping in a bit longer, on a Sunday morning I would get up and take coffee and the papers back to bed where my husband and I would read them and the kids wandered in and out.

Once they all grew up and one by one left home, I could finally have a morning routine that suited me. But it didn’t involve writing or journaling in any way. It just meant coffee and reading my book. I hadn’t properly read a book in years. Now was my chance!

(Just notice how often coffee pops up in this story!)

Then I got MS. I had managed to keep a journal going when my symptoms started, because I needed to get things on paper (yes paper!) for my mental health.

Since I’ve been a tetraplegic (10 years now) I have a morning routine that is not of my choosing. Now I couldn’t write in the morning even if I wanted to. My mornings are strictly controlled to be ready for carers every morning when they come at 9.30 a.m.

Twice a week community nurses come in at 10 and the carers at 11. Since I am put to bed at 6 in the evening, most days are short. I have to fit all my writing and other things like seeing my friends and family into this short day.

I suppose these very productive bloggers must have become successful so they treat it as a business. I have been learning to blog for six months now and it’s changed and enriched my life in so many ways. But my morning routine is as it is!

I just hope I’m as successful as they are one day even without the enviable morning routine!

Photo by Austen Distel on Unsplash

How My Life Changed Almost Overnight

And what I’ve learned

Photo by Kinga Cichewicz on Unsplash

In 2004 fear took over my life. This is when the first symptoms of MS began, and I had no idea what was happening to me. I went from a fit, active person to someone who could only walk a short distance, had difficulty driving, could no longer type with both hands and so many other things. Almost overnight.

The fear was intense, I suffered panic attacks, I cried a lot, lashed out at my husband and he at me. This was completely alien to me, we had been married for a long time and for the most part happily. Neither of us could understand why I kept falling over and had to rest for half an hour after my morning shower before I could get dressed!

I went to my GP. It took six months to get an appointment with a spinal surgeon, who sent me to a Neurologist. He told me I’d had a stroke!

After a hospital stay and every test known to man, waiting another four months to see the Neurologist again, I was then a ‘puzzle’.

Another stay in hospital, a visit to Queens Hospital in London, where some random doctor bashed me on the head several times with what looked like a tennis racket, still no answers!

After another four months waiting to see the neuro again, by which time he’d forgotten who I was. We told him we were going to live in France (see https://bellesdays.com/20/11/2019). He more or less said ‘have a nice life’ or words to that effect!

Whilst in France, I had two further MRI scans and, finally, after six years I was told that I had Primary Progressive MS. It came as a huge relief that I now knew what I was dealing with, and huge sadness because I knew that I would always have it.

I was in a wheelchair by this time anyway and I was getting used to the fact that I could no longer stand up.

Despite everything that has happened in the last 10 years since my diagnosis, here I am. I’m not saying that I’m not anxious, I am a lot of the time. You never come to terms with having everything taken away, but you learn to live with it, and to enjoy the new life you find yourself living.

I maintain my interests, reading, politics, food, I have taken online courses and learned (am still learning) to blog. Having MS in whatever form does not mean not having a meaningful life, just a different one.

We came home from France in 2016. It was quite a difficult decision but the right one. Life is too short to miss being around family and friends and watching your grandchildren grow up.

This is my story. It’s taken me 16 years to reach this point. Life is never simple. Everybody’s MS is different. I won’t say the fear has completely gone, I don’t think it ever will. People ask me why I’m always smiling. I say that I have two choices – I either do or I don’t. For me it’s not a difficult choice to make.

Read more

https://www.ms-uk.org

https://ms.newlifeoutlook.com.

https://www.sueryder.org

Photo by Adriel Kloppenburg on Unsplash